Find partnership terms by letter

Terms starting with

C

Noun

[canna-bal-izm]

Cannibalism (also called product or market cannibalism) occurs when a product released by a company competes for market share with an existing product of theirs. The new product "eats" demand for the old, reducing sales and profit of their existing product. Some amount of product cannibalism is expected with new product launches, and companies normally consider the financial risks and rewards of releasing new products carefully.

Cannibalism can result in overall positive or negative effects on a company's bottom line, and can be either intentional or unintentional. When it's intentional, it's referred to as a cannibalisation strategy.

Example: Leo's team released a new file sharing software, but it soon became apparent that the demand for their other file sharing softwares was plummeting in favor of the new release. They'd caused cannibalism by putting out a product that ate up demand for their other products.

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Noun

[cir-ti-fi-kay-shun]

Certifications are acknowledgements granted to partners for achieving certain milestones. Usually, they acknowledge that a partner has completed product training and is now qualified to represent the company as a partner. They are most often earned as a part of the onboarding process, wherein the partner must learn about the vendor's product to a degree that allows them to comfortably sell/market/share it. Certifications are usually earned early on in the partner journey, but they can also be earned again after product updates or new releases that require subsequent training.

Example: Luke had received his initial product certification on behalf of his partner program shortly after joining Vento's referral program, but a significant update to the main product offering meant he'd be earning an updated certification to make sure he still knew his stuff.

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[chan-l pahrt-ner proh-gram]

Noun

A business initiative that drives revenue through established distribution partnerships rather than direct sales and marketing. Channel partnership programs are common in a wide variety of industries, including software-as-a-service (SaaS). Companies love channel partnership programs because they’re often a more efficient way to drive revenue than traditional sales and marketing tactics. Since partners are tasked with finding leads, referrals, and/or sales, company employees don’t have to generate these valuable business outcomes directly themselves. They simply have to enable partners to be successful.

Channel partnership programs have many benefits. In addition to being a more efficient source of growth, partnerships often help companies access new audiences through their partners. For example, a software company may have great traction finding new customers through paid search ads. But if they partner with an agency that has a roster of clients who are not as digitally savvy (and thus may not find the software company via Google), the company can access a new audience that they previously would not have been able to reach. What’s more, agencies often have built deeply trusting relationships with their clients, so a recommendation from the agency means prospective clients will be primed to trust the software company more.

Example: Rivka drove 45% Acme Corp’s FY2022 revenue through her channel partner program.

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An affiliate, reseller, vendor, or agency that partners with another organization to market and sell their products through co-marketing efforts.

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In a channel partnership, the vendor (PartnerStack’s customer - i.e. the company that makes the product) uses a partner to resell, manage, and/or deliver the product to end customers.

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Noun

[chan-l seylz]

Channel sales, also known as indirect sales or partner sales, are sales facilitated through third parties instead of directly through a company’s sales team. These third parties may be agencies, influencers, or distributors. This is a common go-to-market strategy amongst B2B (business-to-business) software companies.

Channel sales is often a far more efficient system for driving revenue than direct sales, since the company doesn’t have to hire a sales team. Rather, the company only pays if and when partners make sales. Typically, partners are paid a cut of the sale, so it doesn’t require the same degree of overhead investment or risk as hiring and training an inside sales team.

That being said, to unlock maximum growth potential, many companies opt to use both direct and channel sales. Since partners will likely have access to different audiences than your sales team, it’s often worth investing in both. The programs are usually complementary as opposed to cannibalistic

Example: Lavender Ltd. drove 30% of their revenue last year via channel sales, up from 20% the year before.

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Noun

[con-tent mar-kit-ing part-nur-ship]

Content marketing partnerships are facets of strategic partnerships wherein a company works with a partner to promote through content marketing. Content marketing partnerships work to expand your reach (by exposing your brand to your partner's audience) and boost your SEO performance, both of which can positively affect brand recognition and sales. Content marketing partnerships require alignment on content strategy and should incorporate the best of each company's brand to create compelling content.

Content marketing partnerships can include sponsored content and posts or co-created content. Whether or not the content is sponsored or co-created, it should fit into the wider editorial look and feel of the company posting it.

Example: To see a real-world example of content marketing partnership, check out the collaboration between Intel and Uproxx. Intel wanted to position itself as a top choice for creatives, so they created a co-branded event with Uproxx (a culture and lifestyle magazine) wherein creators presented work they made through Intel. Both brands got to benefit from exposure to each other's audiences.

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A satisfied customer who vocally supports a product and helps market the product to their peers.

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A satisfied customer who often takes on a special role helping promote the company and their offerings to their peers.

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Noun

[kuhs-tuh-mer loi-uhl-tee proh-gram]

A customer loyalty program is an organized system that allows a company to reward customers for their engagement. The company may offer incentives to customers who promote their brand on social media and in real life, refer business, and perform other activities that are beneficial to the brand. In return, the customers may receive points, swag, conference tickets, gift cards, or other rewards.

Many B2B software vendors understand that their customer base is one of their greatest untapped marketing and sales resources. By encouraging happy customers to share their positive experiences with their peers, vendors can leverage customers as a low-cost, highly effective marketing channel. For example, customers may receive points that can later be redeemed for rewards by referring new business. Or customers may receive cash incentives when they generate new deals that close.

Also known as customer advocacy programs.

Example: As ChamomileCorps’ #1 fan, Refika told all her entrepreneurs friends that the software was a must-have and had saved her a great deal of time and money. Since she received 500 points on ChamomileCorps’ Cham-pions program for every referral, by the end of the year, she had received enough points to redeem them for a brand new iPad.

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