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Channel sales

Channel sales

Noun

[chan-l seylz]

Channel sales, also known as indirect sales or partner sales, are sales facilitated through third parties instead of directly through a company’s sales team. These third parties may be agencies, influencers, or distributors. This is a common go-to-market strategy amongst B2B (business-to-business) software companies.

Channel sales is often a far more efficient system for driving revenue than direct sales, since the company doesn’t have to hire a sales team. Rather, the company only pays if and when partners make sales. Typically, partners are paid a cut of the sale, so it doesn’t require the same degree of overhead investment or risk as hiring and training an inside sales team.

That being said, to unlock maximum growth potential, many companies opt to use both direct and channel sales. Since partners will likely have access to different audiences than your sales team, it’s often worth investing in both. The programs are usually complementary as opposed to cannibalistic

Example: Lavender Ltd. drove 30% of their revenue last year via channel sales, up from 20% the year before.

More Partnership terms beginning with
C
Customer ambassador

Noun

[cuss-toe-mur am-bass-a-der]

A customer ambassador is a satisfied customer who takes on a special role helping promote the company and its offerings to their peers. Customer ambassadors have experience with the product, believe in its value, and are willing to recommend it to others. They sometimes contribute to customer case studies, webinars, and other promotional activities for the company.

Customer ambassadors are an extremely important avenue of promotion since personal endorsements and recommendations are so highly valued in a buyer's journey. To spot customer ambassadors, look for successful, highly engaged customers who refer business to you.

Example: Kelly noticed a particular customer was the referral source for several new leads. She reached out to the customer and found they loved the product. Kelly invited the customer to participate in a webinar. Voila, a customer advocate!

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Cannibalism

Noun

[canna-bal-izm]

Cannibalism (also called product or market cannibalism) occurs when a product released by a company competes for market share with an existing product of theirs. The new product "eats" demand for the old, reducing sales and profit of their existing product. Some amount of product cannibalism is expected with new product launches, and companies normally consider the financial risks and rewards of releasing new products carefully.

Cannibalism can result in overall positive or negative effects on a company's bottom line, and can be either intentional or unintentional. When it's intentional, it's referred to as a cannibalisation strategy.

Example: Leo's team released a new file sharing software, but it soon became apparent that the demand for their other file sharing softwares was plummeting in favor of the new release. They'd caused cannibalism by putting out a product that ate up demand for their other products.

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